Tag Archives: Beth Sachan

Nashville’s Dining Scene: Our Food Writers Weigh In

ErinHopefully by now, you’ve had some time to dig into the April issue and our list of Nashville’s 50 Best Restaurants. We’ve received a fair amount of feedback, both in agreement and opposition to our list—which was exactly what we were hoping for. I love talking food with people, whether it’s dissecting every dish of my last meal or scheming up ideas for the next one. But the conversation I sat in on for our Best Restaurants list was my favorite kind since it got some of the city’s most well-versed food lovers dishing on what they love (and don’t) about Nashville’s food scene.April 2013 Best Restaurants

Because I’m still a Nashville newbie, I was fascinated to hear what the locals think of all this national media we’ve received. As the Tennessean’s Jennifer Justus (JJ) admitted, “I think we have more restaurants, but I don’t think all this praise from outside means that we have anything going on that’s really super amazing and creative.” Beth Sachan (BS) of the blog Eat.Drink.Smile. agreed: “We have all these restaurants opening but I feel like there’s so much that’s the same. It’s like the whole farm-to-table thing: Can we get something that’s a little more interesting?”

So, there’s certainly space for other types of cuisine and more creative influence, it seems. Chris Chamberlain (CC) who writes regularly for Nashville Lifestyles laid it out for me, saying, “We still don’t have a good Chinese restaurant, we still don’t have a great Mexican restaurant. We still don’t have any place to get a paella, there’s no good Jewish food in town.” Long-time food writer Kay West (KW) chimed in, adding, “No good Cuban food, no Spanish food, I still don’t think there’s any good Italian. Where would the mob go? That’s what I want to know.”

Well, then what are we doing right? I wondered. Turns out, plenty. Here’s just a taste of our conversation:

CC: We are attracting folks like Phil Krajeck [of Rolf & Daughters] coming in from out of town, Sean [Brock] coming in and bringing his new chef. We are becoming a destination for chefs to go. We don’t have that advantage of a big cooking school here. We don’t have a Johnson & Wales, but we’ve got the Art Institute and Nashville State. That’s burgeoning. And that leads to developing younger talent.

KW: I also wonder, what incentive is there for someone to come along and be daring and exciting and innovative? I’m not saying that restaurants need to dumb down but I think if you’re a chef who’s investing your own money or trying to get investors and it’s such a hard business, you don’t have big bucks behind you, then you’re going to have to make something that’s going to have a return. Your investors want to see a return. So you’ve got to find that balance between what’s going to be successful and what’s going to be creatively exciting to that small group of diners.

Food Writers

Nashville food writers: Kay West, Chris Chamberlain, Beth Sachan and Jennifer Justus

JJ: I will say that when City House first opened, I would recommend it to people, but I would say, “don’t expect meatballs.” I don’t have to do that anymore. I can just be like, “go to City House.” I do think the level of sophistication is growing.

BS: I think people are more open minded. Another positive thing is [that restaurants are] sourcing locally. Because in the last couple years, a lot more restaurants are naming all the different farms they’re sourcing from and I love that.

JJ: When I interviewed Jeremy [Barlow of Sloco] recently, he was like, ‘I remember it used to be five farmers I could call, and now it’s over 60.’

KW: And a lot of restaurants are doing their own farms, too. That was a pipe dream ten years ago.

Nashville Food Writers

CC: And we’ve got purveyors like Porter Road that we didn’t use to have. There wasn’t access to a butcher that could provide you with locally sourced meat that could be processed the way you wanted it processed. If you didn’t have a local butcher, which we really didn’t, there was no option even if you wanted it. I mean chefs don’t have time to drive to a farm in Millington to bring back a cow.

JJ: That’s another thing, I don’t think they make me describe CSA anymore in a story. It used to be like, what is that?

CC: And we do have a great community of chefs. It may not be one big community, but there are small groups, and they work in each others’ kitchens. I remember when Kahlil [Arnold] told me—he used to work at the Loveless for Tom Morales—and when he left the Loveless to go back and work at his family business, Tom wasn’t mad, he said, ‘how many of my guys do you need to take with you to help run that place because you need to take care of your family business.’”

Nashville Food Writers

KW: I think there’s a huge amount of support among the chefs.

JJ: You know years ago I remember, I think it was in this magazine that I read it, one of the Goldbergs [of Strategic Hospitality] said that if you start something here, people don’t instantly want to drag you down, they want you to succeed. And I think that spirit is definitely going on here.

So, reader: What say you? What is Nashville doing right? And what would you like to see more of? Give us your two cents—and while you’re at it, make sure you have a copy of the April issue. (Comment here or email us at wehearyou@nashvillelifestyles.com)

Cheers!

— Erin B. Murray, Managing Editor

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Nashville’s Most Beautiful People

Last night we celebrated our 25 Most Beautiful People and the unveiling of our October 2010 11th anniversary issue with a blow-out party at the new (never-seen-before) Virago on the corner of 12th and McGavock Street. The party was hopping with some of Nashville’s finest including Ashlyne Huff, Beth Sachan, Mary Beth Chapman, J.T. Hodges, Max Goldberg, Laura Wright, Amy Louise, Shane Tallant, Rodney Atkins and more!

A very special thanks to all our amazing sponsors including Bacardi, Cadillac, First Tennessee Bank, Vanderbilt Center for Cosmetic Plastic Surgery, Vitamin Water, Flavour and Flavour Men.

Check out all the Nashville Lifestyles Most Beautiful People Party Pics here!

ALSO, (drum roll please) … meet all our 2010 Most Beautiful People HERE! Aren’t they an attractive bunch?

Nashville Lifestyles’ Bartender Bash

Our annual Bartender Bash is THIS WEEK! This is always one of our favorite events and it quickly sold out last year … so, get your tickets today while they last!

Here are the details: On Thursday, August 26 from 6-8 p.m. your favorite bartenders (from Rumba, Morton’s, 1808 Grille, Whiskey Kitchen, Wild Ginger and more) compete for Most Creative Cocktail and Best Grey Goose Martini at Union Station’s Hotel Lobby. Guests will enjoy sampling their drinks, tasty hors d’oeuvres and live music. A celebrity panel of judges (including Laura Bell Bundy, Ty Brown from ABC’s The Bachelorette, Nashville Food Blogger Beth Sachan (http://www.betheats.blogspot.com/), and Regional Director of Grey Goose Vodka, Robert Epstein) will make the final decisions, but we need your input, tasting and enthusiasm for the People’s Choice Award.

Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 at the door and include 2 complimentary Grey Goose cocktails, cocktail tastings from the competing bartenders, hors d’oeuvres and more. Get your tickets and meet this year’s bartenders HERE!

Look through party pics from last year’s sold out event here.